Obama and Romney spar on economy

pa.press.net
Barack Obama launched a television ad with a scathing summation of challenger Mitt Romney's tax plans (AP/Pablo Martinez Monsivais) // Barack Obama launched a television ad with a scathing summation of challenger Mitt Romney's tax plans (AP/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)
Barack Obama launched a television ad with a scathing summation of challenger Mitt Romney's tax plans (AP/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)
Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney said his economic programme would create 12 million new jobs in the next four years, turning his attention back to the economy before the release of an important report on US unemployment.
The jobs report is sure to refocus the campaign on the all-important topic of the economy and away from Mr Romney's missteps during his recent trip to Britain, Israel and Poland. Voters remain worried about the exceedingly slow recovery from the Great Recession and stubbornly high national unemployment, now at 8.2%.
Mr Romney sought to seize the moment in his first campaign stop since the troubled trip overseas, likening President Barack Obama to a "dog trying to chase its tail" on strengthening the sluggish economic recovery.
Firing back instantly, Mr Obama said his rival favoured "trickle-down fairy dust" that had failed to fix the economy in the past, and unleashed a new television ad with a scathing summation of Mr Romney's tax plans: "He pays less. You pay more."
The two men campaigned in battleground states hundreds of miles apart, the incumbent in Florida, his challenger in Colorado, both on a mission to convert undecided voters to their side. In a razor-close race, polls show Mr Romney, with his record with a private equity firm, leading as the candidate best qualified to deal with the struggling economy.
The next major marker of economic health comes when the government announces July recruiting and unemployment trends. Economists forecast that US employers added 100,000 jobs in July. That would be slightly better than the 75,000-a-month average from April through June but still below the healthier 226,000 average in the first three months of the year.
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